West Dapto levy cuts leave council $400m short

West Dapto levy cuts leave council $400m short

New caps on developer levies will leave Wollongong City Council with a $400 million shortfall on funds needed to provide community infrastructure for West Dapto.Section 94 development contributions - collected by councils to pay for basic infrastructure such as roads, drains and parks - were capped at $20,000 per residential lot in this week's state budget.The announcement came during the council's public exhibition of its draft West Dapto developer contribution plan, which proposes fees of up to $41,000 for each residential lot.The council has estimated West Dapto will need $756 million worth of infrastructure during the next 50 years but the cap means the council can collect only half that amount.General manager David Farmer yesterday said the council was seeking urgent talks with the State Government."The cap on Section 94 levies is extremely concerning and will place significant pressure on the successful development of West Dapto," he said."We're seeking formal talks with the State Government to explore strategies that will allow them to satisfy the need to reduce costs of development while ensuring adequate infrastructure is provided to service new greenfield developments."The alternatives were to scaleback West Dapto infrastructure or apply for a city-wide rate rise to fund the shortfall.Major West Dapto landholder and developer Stockland welcomed the changes."At $41,000 per lot it would put land out of reach of people down there and would probably mean releasing fewer lots," said Barry Mann, Stockland's general manager of residential development for NSW."We now will be able to produce more lots at a lower price and more people in the area will be able to afford to buy them."Meanwhile, Shellharbour City Council is facing a different dilemma.General manager Brian Weir wasn't worried about the size of the cap, but was concerned councils could now only charge for "essential infrastructure" specific to each new development. He said Shellharbour council had relied on developer levies to help fund city-wide infrastructure as the city grew, but that would no longer be allowed."Our section 94 levies range from $9000 to $14,000 per lot. But we are absolutely committed to the need for a city-wide levy as well as the precinct levy," he said.Ultimately, he said the scheme would push up rates for all residents."This new system advantages new subdivisions at the expense of existing communities," Mr Weir said.Local Government Association president Genia McCaffery backed councils opposed to the changes and said Camden council could be left with a funding gap of $1.3 billion over 20 years."The Government made these changes with minimal consultation with councils, no transitional arrangements and no understanding of the magnitude of the financial impact on many councils, ratepayers and local communities," she said.
Nanjing Night Net

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Fish-and-chip shops cop a serve over small portions

Fish-and-chip shops cop a serve over small portions

Picture: KEN ROBERTSONLong and skinny or short and stubby, Australians have an undeniable love affair with the humble hot chip.While a kilogram of potatoes is a relatively straightforward proposition, asking for a ''minimum'' or ''small'' serve of chips can produce portions ranging from princely to miserly.The Herald visited five fish-and-chip shops around Sydney to test who is dishing up the most generous servings, and those committing salt and battery on our wallets.At Glebe Fish Bite, the smallest order of chips delivered 220 grams of golden fries for $1.50, making it the best value at 68 cents for 100 grams. It was closely followed by Olde Fashioned Fish & Chips in Naremburn, which cost 83 cents for 100 grams. The poorest value was at Bondi Seafood Market ($1.36/100g) and Peters Fish Market at the Sydney Fish Market ($1.25/100g), which was the only outlet that did not cook the chips fresh.Across the Tasman, consumers have had a skinful of fish-and-chip shops' stinginess with the scoop. The Chip Group - comprising New Zealand potato growers, oil companies and health groups - wants to standardise the size of a ''scoop'' of chips. The Chip Group has already developed standards concerning the cooking, draining and salting of hot chips which have the potential to lower the fat content of chips by 20 per cent. The Heart Foundation has been working with fast food chains and outlets to reduce saturated fat levels by switching to so-called healthier oils. It has also backed a government initiative that would force fast-food chains to display the kilojoule, saturated fat and salt content of their products at the point of sale.''Consumers have a right to know what they're eating and they don't get that when they go to these quick service restaurants,'' said the NSW head of the Heart Foundation, Tony Thirlwell.Australians consume about 359,000 tonnes of hot chips each year, or 16 kilograms per person, while New Zealanders eat their way through about 27 kilograms. ''[Hot chips] don't have to be laden with unhealthy saturated fats. The oils will make the difference because they get absorbed,'' Mr Thirlwell said. Source: smh南京夜网.au
Nanjing Night Net

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Shape your online image, or others will shape it for you

Shape your online image, or others will shape it for you

My story begins with a fax machine. A fax machine in a walk-in stationery cupboard at a law firm at the start of my working life.It was new and fandangled, the height of whiz-bang. We were all taught to work it but no one understood it, so it wasn't long before a paralegal - thankfully not me - got in strife. Something he'd faxed had fallen into the wrong hands."A fax is like a postcard," a partner informed a hastily gathered assemblage in none-too-measured tones. He had a walrus moustache and baggy suit pants anchored by a belt to his ample hips. "It is not private!"Years later, nothing has changed. Broadcast mediums come and go but the principle remains the same. Whether you're faxing, podcasting, blogging, tweeting, retweeting or posting a photo/video/link to your or someone else's MySpace or Facebook page, it's all in the public domain. And if you say it, you must own it, along with any downstream consequences.Privacy has recently been cast by vested interests as a value of yesteryear. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said: "When we got started … the question a lot of people asked was, 'Why would I want to put any information on the internet at all?' [But now] people have really gotten comfortable, not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people."Last week's about-face by Facebook on some aspects of its controversial and complex "opt-out" privacy settings suggests that reports of privacy's death may be greatly exaggerated.But even if Zuckerberg is correct that social norms around personal privacy are relaxing, he left something out.For people to make informed and voluntary decisions about the exchange of their personal privacy for the benefits of social interaction, recognition and celebrity, they must understand the risks and benefits the choice entails.In particular, they must recognise that the snail trail of their online life can be matched, mashed, collated, broadcast and rebroadcast by anybody, in any context, for any reason, for many years into the future.What's out there - however partial, slanted, decontextualised or downright wrong - comprises your online, and contributes to your real-world, reputation.Reputation is an old fashioned word, but today - as in yesteryear - it still matters. What others think about you is a compendium of what you look like, say and do over time, as well as how these elements complement or contradict each other.Reputation matters because people must often make decisions about you before they know you. To do this, they must rely on reputation, or its protean precursor, first impressions.In a world where "no privacy" is the chosen or default setting, there will be a broad range of data out there - a personality test sat long ago, a tweet sent after a first date, photos of a drunken night - from which an interested party can build an image of you. That image may make implicit or explicit claims about your wisdom, competency or character.That our broadcasts may have consequences for our lives often gets missed. This is because most of what we do online attracts little attention. Usually, we are trying - and failing - to be heard.But at some point in nearly everyone's life someone will surface with the time and inclination to track back through the digital detritus of our online existence. They will decide whether to trust, respect, like or do business with us - and advise others to do the same - on the basis of what they see, hear and read.We can't control this process, but we can influence it. We can affect it by taking care with what we allow into the public domain in the first place. We can also proactively develop and nurture our personal brand in the hope that if and when others say false or malicious things about us, they roll like water off a duck's back.Build your image or others will shape it for you, an image consultant told me. "People will think things about you. You can either passively allow that to happen or get actively involved in shaping your reputation," he advised.Leslie Cannold is a Melbourne academic and writer.
Nanjing Night Net

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Geelong to host Nitro Circus event

Geelong to host Nitro Circus event

GEELONG has snared Nitro Circus Live after it was knocked back in Ballarat.
Nanjing Night Net

The motorcycle action show had to look for a new Victorian regional host in August after Ballarat’s City Oval and Eureka Stadium were ruled out.

At the time, Nitro Circus Live promoter Michael Porra said he couldn’t understand why Ballarat couldn’t host the event.

“We’re pretty upset about it and we feel sorry for the people in the area,” Mr Porra said.

He was unable to be contacted for comment yesterday.

Nitro Circus Live was initially meant to be hosted by Eureka Stadium next March but it was too close to the start of the VFL season.

The City Oval was the next choice, but lighting restrictions and lease arrangements were among the reasons it was also ruled out.

The event will now be held on Wednesday, March 20, at Simonds Stadium, home of the Geelong Football Club.

Ballarat Regional Tourism has put the value of the Nitro Circus Live event at nearly $1 million, with 15,000 people expected to attend the Geelong event.

The one-off show will feature 40 motorcyclists performing daredevil stunts, and will be be one of the last in regional Victoria before Nitro Circus Live begins a worldwide tour next year.

Ballarat Regional Tourism chairman Stuart Benjamin said they had worked with all possible venues in Ballarat to host the event.

“However, we were unable to find one suitable for Nitro Circus,” Mr Benjamin said. “We would have liked to have seen it in Ballarat, but (Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal) restrictions ruled the City Oval out, though it met all other conditions.”

Mr Benjamin said BRT had written to Ballarat City Council asking it to investigate solutions to the lighting issue.

“We want to come up with a solution to activate that space.”

[email protected]南京夜网.au

IN ACTION: Nitro Circus

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Saffy vows vengeance on Raiders

Saffy vows vengeance on Raiders

Jarrod Saffy has vowed to avenge St George Illawarra's humiliating defeat on Sunday. Picture: MELANIE RUSSELLSt George Illawarra hard man Jarrod Saffy yesterday declared he wanted revenge on the Raiders.The 25-year-old has vowed to avenge Sunday's humiliating 32-16 defeat in the nation's capital if the two teams were to meet again in September.The loss at Canberra Stadium has opened the door for the green machine to sneak into eighth position, possibly setting up a week one finals showdown with the Dragons. Full coverage of the Dragons Despite failing to register a victory in five appearances against the Raiders, Saffy said he would be happy to take on Canberra in the qualifying final."We owe them one if they come back up here," he said."It would be nice to play them in week one."While the Raiders have proven to be St George Illawarra's bogey team over the past decade, it is the Dragons' recent record against Brisbane which will have fans concerned.The Broncos, who sit on the cusp of the top eight with two weeks remaining, are expected to be fighting for eighth position when they clash with the Raiders in round 26.The red and whites have lost three of their past four games against the Broncos, including last year's semi-final defeat at Suncorp Stadium.While some players will argue statistics count for very little on the paddock, Wayne Bennett's troops can't ignore the losses to Canberra and Brisbane in the last month.Despite losing those respective matches, the Dragons gave their fans a glimmer of hope when they produced dazzling attacking football in the dying stages.But by the time St George Illawarra started playing the attractive brand of football, it was too late.An inability to produce points saw the Dragons bundled out of last year's premiership race in straight sets, and despite copping a barrage of criticism again in 2010, Saffy insists his side aren't about to change their ways."That's the style we feel we need to play going into the finals," the South African-born forward said."I don't think we're going to go away from what works for us."We might throw the ball around a little bit but I don't think things will change too much."Newcastle play a similar style to the Raiders and will be desperate to upset the competition leaders at EnergyAustralia Stadium on Saturday night.The resurgent Knights, who must win against the Dragons to have any chance of playing in the finals, have captured the imagination of the rugby league fraternity with their flair and imagination with the footy.But Saffy said the best way to shut the Knights down was to stick to plan A."They're a big forward pack, so wrestle and line speed will be important," he said."They are going to throw the ball around so they'll test our defence but we'll get back to what works for us."Jeremy Smith and Beau Scott will return for the match, forcing Nick Emmett and Ricky Thorby back to the NSW Cup.
Nanjing Night Net

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.